Quotes

And you weaken your love
And you hold it above your head
Success is a song of the heart, not a song of your bed
— The Paper Kites “Willow Tree March”

“Don’t be reckless with other people’s hearts. Don’t put up with people who are reckless with yours.”
“Remember compliments you receive. Forget the insults. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how.”
“Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it.”
― Mary Schmich of the Chicago Tribune “Wear Sunscreen” (1997)

“Human nature will not flourish, any more than a potato, if it be planted and replanted, for too long a series of generations, in the same worn-out soil. My children have had other birthplaces, and, so far as their fortunes may be within my control, shall strike their roots into unaccustomed earth.”
― Nathaniel Hawthorne, ‘The Scarlet Letter’ (1850)

“An atheist believes that evolution is the result of chance. Theistic evolutionists believe God, having created the universe, let purposeless chance evolve life. A creationist, dismissing this hybrid view as absurd, contends that an intelligent creator creates complex machinery, such as a living body, deliberately.
In fact, by rigorous standards all three theories are metaphysical. This is because a theory of non-deliberate design (evolution) requires proof that no designer ever existed; a theory of deliberate design (creation) requires proof that a designer did exist. Theistic evolution, less logically, requires both proofs! But because the intelligence of a designer can be materially neither in a Boeing 707 nor a bacterium, it is a matter of inference. Neither of the above proofs is scientifically possible because the field of science is limited to the material realm. And therefore each theory of origin is metaphysical.”
― Michael Pitman, ‘Adam and Evolution’ (1984)

“We live in a narrow reality, partly conditioned by our form of perception and partly made by opinions that we have borrowed, to which our self-esteem is fastened. We fight for our opinions, not because we believe in them but because they involve the ordinary feeling of oneself.”
― Maurice Nicoll, ‘Living Time and the Integration of the Life’